What Is Wrong with China?

November 23rd, 2010

China is a highly nationalistic state. But this is not what is wrong with China. Nationalism has proved a boon to many nations over the centuries since the concept swirled from the primordial soup of Medieval Europe. Could it be the dedicated, striving workforce? No. This coupled with the economic boom triggered by market reforms which allowed for a more free market environment have made China far more affluent.

The release of Fault Lines on the Face of China :  50 Reasons Why China May Never Be Great, by two western Journalists, Lacroix and Marriott, got me thinking about this. The authors come up with 50 criticisms of China and spell out why these will hold China back. But every time I try to think of an aspect of China, I think, wow, I admire that… China has great universities, science, an ambitious space program. They have a burgeoning, vital populous, great resources, forward-looking businessmen. They are moving in to take over much of the worlds resources, buying up land, oil, companies, steel, coal, and uranium all over the planet. What is there not to admire about China?

In a word, it is totalitarianism. If there is a stumbling block to greatness, it is the stifling of political and religious thought. A regime where one party rules can mean stagnation and rigidity that can lead to ill-considered geo-political moves. I would argue that the authors might be slightly awry in their title. China already is great. But not as great as she could be…

5 Responses to “What Is Wrong with China?”

  1. KARL LACROIX Says:

    I wonder if your admiration is based on reality and experience or just on positive press releases from a constrictive government?

    Our book surprisingly does not list the government as a fauilt line because all governments cause problems.

    The book deals with decay beyond what most people think exists in China which makes the Middle Kingdom less than great.

    We do not exactly say that these 50 REASONS will hold China back… just that greatness is a freedom not yet bestowed upon China by history.

    Karl Lacroix

  2. admin Says:

    Thanks for commenting Karl. Admittedly, I have never been to China. However, I have been in my wife’s toy store and it is hard to avoid seeing that a majority of the products there are produced in China, many of them very high quality. You have to give the country credit for rising up from the debacle of the cultural revolution. In a comparison of China and the US, I see the U.S. in many ways as the decaying behemoth. (This is largely due to the imposition of Liberalism on the economy and society, and the mindset of the current administration. I believe that the country that hews closest to libertarianism will ultimately be the most successful both culturally and economically.)

  3. KARL LACROIX Says:

    Hmmm…
    ‘I see the U.S. in many ways as the decaying behemoth.’
    and ‘This is largely due to the imposition of Liberalism on the economy and society…’
    But then…’I believe that the country that hews closest to libertarianism will ultimately be the most successful both culturally and economically.’

    I’m confused….best I stick to China I guess.

    The Cultural Revolution was self-imposed so essentially you admire a society that maims, kllls and destroys itself and then after the death of Mao, continues up to the 1989 Tianamen Sq. to destroy the freedom of its people?

    Toys do not change the face of the maker.

    Nor does the shear captialism of China.

    Sadly China is not libertarian in the slightest.

    Karl Lacroix

  4. admin Says:

    Actually, I agree with most of your criticisms. I believe the regime in China especially under Mao was evil. What I admire about the society is its ability to come back from that murderous age. My point is this. The Chinese economy is booming because they have been introducing market reforms, while the US is becoming moribund because of the continued impositions of government restrictions and taxation on the economy.

  5. KARL LACROIX Says:

    Yes you are absolutlely right.

    Also wages make it difficult to originate products there in the states.

    The Chinese are also wage hungry and one day they will find their production out sourced just as other Western competitors have.

    I will reserve my admiration for the day when the citizens of China turf the Communist Party.

    By the way we have produced a new book called ‘I AM MAO – A CONVERSATIONH WITH THE SPIRIT OF THE CHAIRMAN’ which we will release in the early spring.

    It’s an ‘interview’ with the evil man himself about all things modern…a black fact/fantasy approach.

    Karl Lacroix

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.